Home Improvements

Goodland, FL – January, 2018 January was the coldest month we have ever spent in Florida so it wasn’t appealing to go boating very often. On a few of the nicer days we did boat out in the afternoon and start exploring our new home waters.

We spent one morning in a class offered by the Coast Guard Auxiliary that was devoted to navigating the waters around Marco Island. It was extremely helpful and made us more confident about venturing to some places. We also learned of other areas with too many obstacles that we’d rather avoid.

We spent most of January finishing the projects we had planned for this season on our little house. We had several guests scheduled to visit us starting in early February. We wanted to get all our work done so we could just rest and enjoy their company when they arrived.

On all but the chilliest days the weather was pretty great for tackling outdoors jobs. It was better than our first month here when we tried to get most of our outdoor work done before 11 because it was too darn hot to do much after that. On the coldest days we concentrated on our indoor projects.

For a home that flooded during the hurricane, it had remarkably little damage. A tidal surge had swept through it and reached about ankle deep in most of the house. Apparently it exited quickly though and that prevented the damage from being worse.

The previous owner had cleaned the flood damage really well but had not removed the ruined laminate flooring that was in most of the house. When we demoed the flooring we found a lot of dust and some mud still under it. We were glad to get down to the subfloors so we could get it scrubbed clean and dried and know what we were living with. The plywood below the laminates was in extremely good shape and required no additional work.

We replaced the laminate flooring with vinyl planks. They are very similar to laminates but they are waterproof and, thankfully, they were much easier to install. They look great and are comfortable to live with and easy to keep clean.

The paneling in the master bedroom had wicked the flood water and swelled up. So we had to cut it off and replace it with wainscoting to the bottom of the window sills around the room.

We were prepared to do this in the remainder of the house to clean and disinfect any water damage in the walls. We removed several baseboards throughout the house. Remarkably we didn’t find any others where the water had gotten into the walls.

Other than that the house required very little interior work. I love the paint color the previous owner had used to paint most every surface. I was able to get a custom match at the paint store to paint the new wainscoting and touch up around the house.

Jim had to solve one major plumbing issue. The septic started backing up within a few days of us moving in. He ended up having to dig up the septic inlet and found that it was poorly designed 60 plus years ago with a 90 degree turn into the tank AND that, more recently, the inlet pipe had sunken below the inlet hole and someone had made a pretty crappy (pun intended) repair.

He did the right thing and dug up the whole area so he could raise the pipe and add several 45’s to replace the 90. He also added a cleanout which doubles as a place to dump our RV. The good news is that it didn’t end up costing much to fix. It just required several days of hard work and sweat.

We found some other poorly plumbed items in the house, like drains that were just stuck together and not even glued. But other than the plumbing, we have been extremely happy with the quality of workmanship that went into the house before we owned it, like the beautifully tiled shower.

FEMA had tarped the entire roof after Irma but there were no signs that it had actually leaked. In late December we finally removed the tarping and decided it could be repaired which was a huge relief. The before picture is of the worst half of the roof. The after picture is of the other side which had much fewer missing shingles.

We spent a good part of 3 days replacing damaged roof tabs and filling a gazillion holes from the nails used to hold the tarps down. It’s not beautiful but it hasn’t leaked and it’s such a low pitched roof you can’t see it from the ground. The color of the new tabs will eventually blend with the old as they weather.

Most of our budget and effort went into the backyard and the dock. One of the very first things we did was have a hot tub delivered. More than anything about RVing we miss our hot tub. We looked for used ones but couldn’t find a good deal so we splurged on a new, two person tub.

We covered an uneven back porch with a deck.

The palm tree scene on the left is a privacy/sun screen. The south facing back yard can get brutally hot. We recovered the old dock with new decking and enlarged it slightly.

Then we joined the two with a boardwalk and covered much of the back yard in gravel.

Finally we added some decorative lighting.

I’d guess we are about halfway done with everything we hope to accomplish on this home. But the remainder of the projects can, and likely will, wait for next season. As far as project homes go this one is probably the least amount of work of any that we have ever bought.

There are a couple things I feel obligated to pass on in case anyone is considering such an investment. First: I think it is unlikely that you could find anyone to finance such a property. Despite its upgrades, this home is essentially a very old manufactured home that does not qualify for any traditional financing.

We were lucky to have a line of credit (LOC) set up with some of our rental properties as collateral. We arranged it to finance our flip house last season and since we sold it, the LOC was just sitting there. So we were able to make a cash offer and close in two weeks.

Second: We were barely able to insure the property. At first, I wasn’t very concerned about this. The land is worth the majority of what we paid for it so if it burned to the ground we felt we could recover most of our investment anyway. Only later did it dawn on me that no insurance meant no liability insurance, now that would be just plain irresponsible to go without.

I checked with a couple local agents and it wasn’t looking very good. Thankfully I have the majority of my rental properties insured with a real estate investment group and they were finally able to cover the home with a basic policy that will cover fire and, most importantly, provide liability coverage. It does not include hurricane or flood coverages though so, fingers crossed!

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