Chillin’ at Altitude

Duchesne County, UT – July, 2017 Choosing a destination, or even a direction, can be difficult when you have too many options. We hadn’t made any solid plans for the month of July past visiting the North Rim and Bryce Canyon. We finally made up our mind where to go and we headed north.

We first stopped in Richfield, Utah along I-70 because we needed a few things. We stayed at the only campground in town, a KOA, for which we paid almost $50 per night. Other than plenty of retail options there was nothing special about the town of Richfield. It was a flat space between barren hills.

After getting the things we needed we were anxious to move on. We had plenty of time so there was no reason to make any long or multiday drives. Even though our next destination was only 150 miles away I found a campground halfway there and booked it for 2 nights.

Huntington State Park was a man-made oasis in the desert. It was surrounded by fields that, when irrigated, appeared to produce crops to feed livestock. Further away were some brown mountains. The lake appeared clean and the locals certainly enjoyed its waters.

We had a site that backed up to the lake, sorta. The water level was way down so the shore was some distance away. It was a nice site though with a good view and reasonably priced at $25 for water and electric.

My favorite thing about this park was the 3 mile walking path all the way around it. It was relatively cool if you hit the trail early enough in the morning. The only downside was that sometimes you would get a whiff of a truly awful smell. Jim said it was the fertilizer they were spraying on their fields. It was good motivation to pick up the pace through those sections. Other than that it made for a very pleasant walk each morning with bees buzzing, bunnies hopping across the path, and fish jumping in the lake.

We weren’t at all sorry to leave as we were really excited to get to our next stop. Avintaquin Campground in the Ashley National Forrest is at 9,000 foot elevation which sounded like heaven. So even though there was limited information available about it, we took a chance and booked 3 nights. At $5 per night it would help offset some of our more costly campsites as well. It had absolutely no services; no electricity, no dump, no water.

We obviously expected a climb to get there and had no concerns about our 1 ton truck being able to handle the roads. We got stuck behind a semi with tandem trailers that was crawling up the mountain between 8 and 12 miles per hour for the entire four mile section of 8% grade. We then pulled onto the road to the campground which the few reviews we found said was a good road and discovered it was the real challenge. It had somehow escaped me that it was a whole mile of gravel to the camp.

It was barely more than a one lane road with hardly any place to pull off if you were unfortunate enough to meet someone. We also still had several hundred feet to climb and most of that took place on one short hill. It was the only hill Jim has ever seriously worried about this truck pulling the camper up. He had to switch to low 4 wheel-drive, all the time praying no one topped the hill in front of him.

We made it though and gratefully pulled into the campground and found a place to pull over. Jim let the truck cool down, and did a little chilling himself. And I walked the loop our site was located on and made sure it was safe to drive.

I wasn’t crazy about how tight the loop road was but I was confident we could make it. Thankfully our site, #5, was at an angle that would make backing in pretty easy. It also turned out to be the levelest of the ones in that loop. Here we are all snug in our site.

I don’t think Jim will agree to come back again but our 3 day stay has been wonderful. There is one site not too far behind us but thankfully noone has used it during our stay. There is a barbed wire fence about 40 feet from our front door and I will admit the neighbors on that side do sometimes look at us a little weird.

Storm clouds formed each afternoon. Twice they circled all around and we only got a sprinkle. But one afternoon the thunder was calamitous and the clouds were pretty ominous looking.

It rained for a good while and we even got some pea sized hail. In general the weather was awesome though, with highs in the mid 70’s and lows around 50.

The same road we drove to the campground on continues past the camp for 13 miles. It is called Reservation Ridge Road and it is a scenic backway. There are plenty of boondocking sites along the way. If we did return here we would likely choose one of them rather than stay in the campground.

We decided to follow this road on a Friday morning and see what there was to see. There were lots of views of the surrounding mountains but most of those views were only visible through a stand of pines. Rarely did we get an unobstructed view like this one of a valley and mountains to the north.

We finally found an overlook to the South. The spot of blue smack dab in the middle is a little mountain lake.

Since the road was curvy and just one lane we were grateful we didn’t meet another vehicle. We did have to put up with some local traffic. Like this guy who wasn’t taking any bull. He refused to move for a minute but finally yielded the right of way.

The entire trip was between 9,000 foot elevation and just under 10,000. I loved the wildflowers in every color.

The only part of the trip I didn’t enjoy was at the very end of the road where it made a long decent while clinging to the side of a very tall hill. The scenic backway then ended abruptly in the middle of nowhere. We planned to take a different forest road back to a highway and return by way of the blacktop.

We turned down that road and were confronted with barely a tunnel through the trees and a mud pit the length of a football field. Nope, it was back the way we’d come. I didn’t mind at all except for having to climb up the side of that hill. Here was my view straight down the hill from the passenger seat.

I know it doesn’t look that bad but as we climbed higher those aspens got farther and farther away. We had an uneventful trip back and enjoyed seeing the views in reverse. We saw pheasants on the way in and again on the way back. I don’t think I’ve ever seen a pheasant in the wild before.

I had hoped we’d see an elk or, better yet, a bear, both of which are supposed to be common in the area. We probably saw a thousand chipmunks. They were constantly zipping across the road in front of us.

The next day we drove down from the mountain to the town of Price. We got a few groceries, filled the truck’s tank, and picked up lunch. We then chose a spot on the map we thought would be good for a picnic.

We drove 3 miles of road that wasn’t much better than the scenic backway from the day before except it was paved and they had widened the road on the corners so that it was almost 2 lanes. That was good because there were alot of corners. It was just one switchback after another.

At the end was a parking lot with a few picnic tables overlooking Price Canyon. We had the place to ourselves and thoroughly enjoyed our lunch with a view.

On Sunday morning we reluctantly came down off our cool mountain and faced the heat of summer again.

Kanab

Kanab, UT – July, 2017 We headed next to Kanab, Utah, just over the Arizona border. It was meant to be a stop on the way to the next place we wanted to be. But we ended up enjoying the layover very much.

We had driven straight through Kanab without stopping our first year out. We were on our way from visiting Zion to seeing Lake Powell. I recently read a post by one of my favorite bloggers, Ingrid at Live Laugh RV, about tent camping in a state park near Kanab called Coral Pink Sand Dunes State Park. I thought “we were right there, how’d we miss that?”

So bright and early our first morning in the area we drove over to check it out. The park seems specifically designed to appeal to those with ATV’s (all terrain vehicles) or as they are often referred to in these parts OHV’s (off highway vehicles). The campground loop was pretty tight and I wouldn’t want to try to get my 5th wheel through it.

The sand really was a very nice shade of coral.

blog121b n park

We were most intrigued with trying to guess which animals the many footprints in the sand belonged to.

There was basically just the one viewing platform in the park. From there you could hike off across the sand if you wanted. We didn’t relish starting our day with sand in our shoes so we passed and left the park.

The views from the road just outside the park’s gates were so enticing that we stopped at the first pullout. From there you had no option but to climb a pink mountain if you wanted a better look. We decided to go for it and shake out our shoes later.

When we tackled the mountain we found that the sand had a wonderful powdered sugar quality to it. It was amazingly soft and for some reason not prone to getting in your shoes. You didn’t sink into it as much as expected and it didn’t fly around as much as normal sand.

At the second pullout after we left the park was a very large parking area. It appeared boondocking (free camping, dispersed camping, etc.) was allowed. It was too hot to consider this option in July but if we returned during the spring or fall we would absolutely consider camping there and exploring the fluffy, pink mounds some more.

You could easily stop at either of these pullouts to explore the sands and avoid the $8 per day state park fee. But we don’t begrudge the state a reasonable fee for protecting such an awesome area. We enjoyed meeting the work camper that collected that fee and talked to her about her and her husband’s life as hosts and full-time RVers.

Since arriving in Kanab, we had seen several of the same type of snake dead on the road. While in the state park we finally saw one alive, thankfully from the safety of our truck. He was crossing a parking lot.

He was quite lively so we didn’t really get close enough to tell if he was poisonous. We didn’t think he was. Even so it reminded us to stay on trails where we could see that there was a clear path in front of us.

Kanab was a very nice town with an outstanding visitor center, two small but excellent grocery stores, and a pleasant vibe. We inquired about hiking trails and were directed to a hike around the hill that dominated the skyline to the east of the town. The hill proudly displayed the town’s initial K on it. We stayed on the path but this entire family chose to scramble up the hill and onto said K.

The hill provided welcome shade at the beginning and the end of the hike.

And the path afforded excellent views of the town and the surrounding red cliffs.

Highway 89 through Kanab was the main thoroughfare we drove each day while exploring the area. It is a scenic highway and the views all along it are incredible. There is no reason to explore beyond the highway when it affords you views like these.

And this cool pond we passed every day. Apparently there used to be a campground here but it was bankrupt by a snail. According to our RoadsideAmerica app there was an endangered snail in this pond and the powers that be gave them so much trouble they had to shut the campground down.

I kept seeing the same striking blue bird in the area but never could catch a pic of it. I finally saw one that stayed still long enough for a photo op.

Jim was taken by this beautiful bloom. It had such detail for a small flower. It wasn’t much bigger than an inch in size.

I chose a campground 10 miles north of Kanab as the attractions in the area I was interested in were all just north of the town. The campground was called East Zion Riverside RV Park but it was part of the Thunderbird Lodge in Mt. Carmel. The rates were reasonable at $40 for full hookups but the perks were priceless.

They had a nice pool and a hot tub that were available 24 hours a day. We only made it to the pool one afternoon. But we were in the hot tub by 7 every morning of our stay and had it all to ourselves while the rest of the guests slept.

There is one day of our stay in Kanab that deserves it’s very own blog. I’ll get that post up within a few days!

Westward Ho

Missouri to Arizona – July, 2017 We left Missouri and headed west. The first day, we drove all day and put the entire state of Oklahoma behind us. Then we slowed a bit, averaging about 3 hours a day, and only taking one day completely off during that first week.

It wasn’t a bad trip but it wasn’t terribly exciting either. There certainly wasn’t much to write home about. We found Tucumcari, New Mexico the most interesting stop of the trip.

We pulled in to the Cactus RV Park before lunchtime.

We thought it was one of the more interesting RV parks we have stayed at. RV spaces are in the courtyard of an old Route 66 hotel originally known as the Cactus Motor Lodge. The property was built in the early 1940’s and originally included a dance hall.

The motel rooms are no longer in use but are still cool looking.

They have some neat features including this detail in the handrails.

It’s a shame the buildings have fallen into such disrepair. Here is a postcard I found online promoting the hotel in its heyday.

Tucumcari turned out to be an interesting little town full of similar establishments. Some were in operation despite being a little rundown.

Others were lovingly restored.

There were some fun gift shops with classic Route 66 souvenirs.

We walked the strip a couple times, first in the afternoon, and again early in the morning while some of the neon still glowed. The Blue Swallow is a 1939 built motor court with garages attached to most rooms. It is beautifully restored.

Following is my favorite picture of the Blue Swallow. I took some liberties with it and the photo editor app, Snapseed.

The town of Tucumcari is relatively flat but is lorded over by the imposing Mount Tucumcari. You can see it from almost any place in town. We thought we might drive up it but didn’t get too far before the rough road made us turn around.

I doubt we could have entertained ourselves in Tucumcari for a whole other day. But it was a pleasant stopover on a long road trip and we certainly would stop again. The Cactus RV Park was peaceful and clean and you can’t beat $20 per night for a full hookup site with a Passport America discount.

More time in MO

May –June, 2017 – Springfield, MO I can’t believe we spent seven weeks in Missouri and I’m having trouble accounting for where all that time went. The first week was committed to cleaning up the flood damage to our family’s river house. But the remainder of the time was something of a blur.

We visited all our doctors. We helped some friends move. And we, or I should say Jim, helped our friends with various home improvement projects.

We checked on all our rental properties and performed maintenance on those that were in need of it. One tenant gave notice and moved out during this time so we were able to get the home cleaned, painted, and re-rented ourselves. Another tenant that had been falling behind all winter agreed to move and we were able to get him out without involving the courts which I doubt would have been the case if we hadn’t physically been there.

We attended numerous social events. We visited with our son and his family. And we spent some quality time with our favorite granddaughter. She’s the one in the middle.

We did devote some time to getting our new home and ourselves organized. We had moved in such a hurry that we weren’t really sure where everything ended up. We took the rig to get a new AC unit because the factory installed one just wasn’t cutting the mustard and we also got new tires on her before we left.

Looking back on that list it’s a wonder we did get it all done. We primarily stayed in Springfield but we did leave for a few weekends. While in Springfield we stayed at a familiar campground on the south side of town.

Ozark Highlands Mobile Home Park is conveniently located in the southeast part of Springfield. Last year we came and went from this park and at the end of our visit I realized we spent enough at their weekly and nightly rates that we could have stayed there the whole time at their monthly rate for less money.

So this time I made a month long reservation. The park was kind of a pain, actually requiring a 6 page application! This was the first rental application I’ve ever had to complete for an RV space.

But in the end we saved some money. The monthly rate was only $450 plus electric and when I needed to extend our stay for two more weeks I assumed it would be at the weekly rate. Instead they prorated their monthly rate so the extra days were only $15 per day.

Two of the three weekends we did leave we only moved 30 miles to our friends’ 40 acre property in rural Lawrence County. It’s a great place for all our friends to gather. They all own travel trailers now so we circle the wagons and just hang out.

One morning while Jim helped with an electrical project I found myself free as a bird. The weather was surprisingly cool for late June so I happily took an hour long stroll on some county roads. It was a beautiful morning.

Flowers were blooming and the birds were singing.

I was soon making friends.

This pair was a little more shy.

When this fellow and his brother came barreling across a lawn at me I felt a twinge of anxiety. My fear was momentary as they just wanted to say hi but I will likely remember my club next time I’m walking alone in a rural area.

It wouldn’t be a walk in the countryside without a red barn.

This old mailbox has seen better days.

This was only one of many flags displayed along the way.

So that’s all I have to show for two months in Missouri. Next up, we head west for the summer.

An Epic Flood

May, 2017 – Bonita Springs, Fl to Doniphan, MO In all our plans for leaving Florida we had a date in mind that we hoped to go, May 5th. This was two days after my last day of babysitting and the day our rent was paid through. But we didn’t have any hard commitments that required us to be anywhere.

So we figured when the flip house got done, when Lance got sold, when we’d visited sufficiently with our daughter, and (after we made the offer on our new trailer) when we got everything moved and the Alpenlite sold or ready for storage, then we would leave. This all changed when we learned that our own Current River was forecast to peak well above the highest flood in written history.

My family and I own a lovely little home there in Doniphan, Missouri. I’ve mentioned it briefly a couple times in my posts but it is actually a very special place. My family (my father, Jim and I, my three brothers and their wives, along with the help of other family members) built the home as a tribute to my dear mother. She loved the river and the property she and my father owned for nearly 30 years on its banks and she always dreamed of a home there but died of cancer in 2008 without that dream ever being realized.

We built the house over several years. Much of the work occurred in 2010. We started it that spring and got it roofed and sided by fall. Then we spent the next several years finishing it out as time and money became available.

I didn’t realize how few pictures I had of the house until we faced losing it. But here are some over the course of its construction.

The view from the riverfront. Eventually we extended the deck across the full length of the house and got that last piece of fascia on.

And here is the front which faces the road.

The kitchen cabinets were the last thing put in. My brother built and installed the lowers a couple years ago but just finished and installed the uppers a couple months ago.

So you can see why we were concerned and why we continued to make preparations to leave Florida but with a lot more urgency.

We checked the page on the internet often where they record the water gauge in my hometown. It also forecasts when it will peak and how high it will get. We helplessly watched for several days as both numbers went ever higher, surpassing the initial estimates by many, many feet.

In the meantime we kept very busy. We hired out some work on the flip house that we had intended to complete ourselves, we finalized the purchase of our new camper long distance as the owners were home in Michigan, and we began packing for the move to our new trailer.

There wasn’t much we could do about the house but watch and wait. By the time our family realized the rising water was really a problem there was very little that could be done. The road to the neighborhood floods well before the houses do so even if someone had wanted to go retrieve any property they would have had to make that decision well in advance.

Noone imagined it getting as bad as it did. We have watched the water rise so many times in the past and seen flood forecasts that looked ominous but never got as bad as they predicted. Even if we had been there it is likely we wouldn’t have moved much.

Here is what the page looked like that we kept checking. At this point on April 30th, the river was almost 29 and a half feet above normal. We knew then that it was in the house. At that time they predicted it might go as high as 39.5 feet, which would have pretty much swallowed our house up. You would have only seen a little of the roof above the water if that had come to pass.

So we were quite relieved when it actually crested at ONLY 33.13 feet a day and a half later. This was more than 6 feet over the historic flood of 1904. Our house was one of the newer ones in the neighborhood and we built the floor just above that flood level. Most of our neighbors were several feet lower and many live there full time so we knew their troubles were way worse than ours.

We hoped that the flood water hadn’t reached our ceiling level. If the water reached the ceilings it would double the amount of work required to restore our home. But we had to wait another two days, until May 3rd, before the road was passable so my brother could go assess the damage.

My closest brother lives in Springfield, Missouri so he got down there that afternoon. Here is his initial view when he walked through the front door.

And here was our new kitchen.

He was surprised it was actually hard to tell where the water had reached. There was not an obvious water line. He finally determined it had gotten about 6 feet up the walls. There was a thin layer of silt over every horizontal surface but the vertical surfaces were surprising clean.

My other brothers from Texas showed up that first weekend and together they did the majority of the demo. They cut off and removed the drywall at 6 feet and removed the kitchen cabinets. They saved the uppers and believe they are salvageable but had to throw out the lower cabinets.

One of the biggest issues was finding a place to dispose of the trash. They were relieved when some volunteers showed up with trailers and offered to haul off all the furniture. That was a huge help.

There were no dumpsters available anywhere. They heard of a dump site on Sunday and loaded up a trailer full and hauled it there. That site was soon full. The rest of the debris, they had to throw off the front porch.

While they worked hard on the house, we worked our tails off to get moved into our new 5th wheel and on the road to Missouri. We finally left Florida on Monday, May 8th. And we were never more relieved to see this sign on Thursday, May 11th.

We stayed in Doniphan a week and our good friends, Amy and Terry, generously took a couple days off work to come help. My brother and his wife came back for the weekend. Our friend’s mother, Cindy, lives nearby so she visited almost every day bringing us amazing desserts, actually doing a load of laundry for me, and even taking a couple items we were about to throw away and cleaning them; that quilt hanging on the living room wall and my wedding dress that I had stored there.

We cleaned and continued to sort through what was left, deciding what was worth salvaging and what was a loss. We were able to finally get a dumpster and we moved the mountain of debris in the front yard into it and finished cleaning out the house. I found someone to haul off the appliances. And then we cleaned, and cleaned, and cleaned some more.

We got all that was salvageable into one room so it will make it easier to work in the rest of the house. We are not sure when that work will take place. Primarily we have to reinsulate, redrywall, and install new doors and trim. We may start it this fall or it may wait until next year. But right now we are just letting the house dry out.

The community of Doniphan along with many others along Missouri’s riverways took a real beating this spring. So many suffered so much. Just in our own neighborhood there were more than a half dozen homes severely damaged, all much worse than ours.

A hard working couple next door have an older home that was built several feet lower than ours so the water reached into their rafters. But the worst part was their windows didn’t hold like ours did. So instead of the thin layer of silt we had to deal with, the river deposited 4 inches of slimy, nasty mud in their home. The home of an elderly couple who had lived there as long as I can remember was severely damaged and their kids used the flood as an excuse to finally move them to the city and put what was left of their home up for sale.

We were lucky in so many ways; that the home was built as high as we ever imagined the waters reaching, that every member of our family is in construction and when we choose to rebuild we can, that the water heater and electrical systems still work and the HVAC appears repairable. Mostly that this was our second home so noone was left homeless and we have the option of walking away and catching our breath before deciding how to proceed.

Florida Roundup

May, 2017 – Bonita Springs, FL So we said adios to Florida after a full 7 months parked in one spot. You’d think I’d have a lot of inside information now on living in Florida and I do have a few insights although it is going to take more than one season to get to know this area. So here are some random thoughts, parting shots, and disorganized ramblings on the subject.

We LOVED our RV park. Bonita Lakes RV Resort is a gem! And if you are ever in the area off season I suggest stopping by for a while. But be careful, you may not want to leave. We met so many people that came for a week, or just one season, and now live there full time or have been coming back every winter for many years.

What makes it special are the people. The managers are the kindest, hardest working, most genuine people you could ever hope to meet. And the rest of the staff are equally nice and will go way out of their way to help you.

The residents are pretty special too. We wish we had had more time to get to know them and participate in more activities. There was certainly never any excuse to be bored.

The activities we did try we were made to feel more than welcome and invited back again. Game night, aerobics, kayak club, bean bag tournament, water aerobics; all things we only tried once because we got caught up in remodeling a house.

Some of the residents were pretty camera shy.

We did finally have a few good sightings.

Some of the more plentiful and less shy inhabitants were the lizards.

And the bunnies.

I have always wanted to see a roseate spoonbill and one afternoon right before we left one stopped by the park for a short visit.

We can’t claim to have experienced Florida during what they call “in season” because from Jan to April we were commuting 20 miles back and forth to our job site almost every day. The RV park did get awfully busy during those months with every site occupied and many parties sometimes late into the night.

The one thing that took some adjustment for us was driving in Florida. They have the streets designed in such a way that U-turns are often a necessity. You know our truck doesn’t U-turn well so this was something of an inconvenience for us.

But more importantly, if you were making a right hand turn you had to be very careful that noone in the left hand turn lane of the road you were turning onto was making a U-turn. I almost made a costly error a couple of times. Eventually I didn’t want to make any right hand turn when they had the green light often to the chagrin of impatient drivers behind me.

The other thing that was hard to get used to was the large number of pedestrians and bicyclers. They were everywhere, even more so near our RV park. The nearby neighborhoods had a large Hispanic population and walking or bicycling seemed to be their primary source of travel.

This was also primarily an issue when making right hand turns. Of course, if we hadn’t been working, we wouldn’t have been driving so often and it wouldn’t have been such an issue. And we learned to be extra cautious and attentive which we should be anyway when behind the wheel of an 8,000 pound machine.

Every local, full year resident we spoke to for any length of time had something to say about how different life was there during the other 8 months out of the year. I got the feeling that many of them shared the sentiment that this person advertised on his bumper. “Welcome to Florida. Now go home.”

So the verdict is in. We love Florida (always have) and we’ll be returning next winter. We don’t plan to be in one RV park for 7 months this time. But we will be back at Bonita Lake RV resort for some part of next winter.

We want a do over. We plan to experience Florida the way we intended to this year before we got caught up in the rat race. We expect to have lots of time to be active and healthy, to meet people, and to spend with family.

Anybody ever wonder what happened to Lance, the truck camper that we bought?

Well, we only took the one trip to Cape Canaveral with it. We did make some repairs to it. There was some water damage around the kitchen window and Jim fixed it which messed up the wallpaper. That gave me an opportunity to do a project I’ve always wanted to try, adhesive plastic tile squares.

It was so easy. The only tool necessary was a pair of scissors. And I think the results were a dramatic improvement.

When we bought the flip house we put the camper in the drive and used the kitchen to prepare our lunches until we got the kitchen in the house remodeled. We used the truck as a second vehicle, mostly on the days that I was babysitting so Jim could go his own way. We sold the topper and then the truck a week before we left.

If you don’t count the value of the work Jim put into it we almost broke even. But we did learn a valuable lesson: we’d be OK with a smaller rig in the future. We might get one to finally make that trip to Alaska someday or if we ever get tired of the road and move back into a house we’d consider a small motorhome or trailer for travel. But it does have to have a bed on the main level. We are too darn old to be climbing in and outta that over-cab bed and we ain’t getting any younger!

Welcome to Our New Home

Bonita Springs, FL – May, 2017 We had been mulling over the idea of a newer 5th wheel for a few months. Not a new one, mind you, but a newer one. We had managed to put the idea on the backburner for more than a full year since our brush with temptation in Palm Springs back in November of 2015.

But the idea kept creeping back into our psyche. We told ourselves we were just keeping an eye on the market. You know, in case something disastrous happened to our rig and we had to replace it.

We finally agreed we would seriously consider a newer rig if the flip house sold. We hoped to find something that would cost no more than half our profit from the flip house, around $14,000, plus whatever we could get out of our Alpenlite, maybe $10,000.

Ideally we would wait until we got back to Missouri because the house couldn’t possibly close until after we left Florida. This would also give us plenty of time to market the Alpenlite in a favorable market we are familiar with. So we weren’t seriously looking in Florida but we weren’t not looking. lol

We saw a 2014 Mesa Ridge by Open Range in our park that they were asking $30,000 for. We looked the 345RLS model up online and I really didn’t like the layout of the living room. I’d seen one like it before and just didn’t think it was what I wanted. And we weren’t seriously looking anyway so we forgot about it for a while.

I was talking to the manager of the RV park and mentioned we’d probably get a newer rig sometime this year. He said we’d be crazy not to look at that Mesa Ridge. That it was the best deal he’d seen in a long time. And that the owners had hardly used it and had taken meticulous care of it.

We went and looked at it and really liked everything about it. It did look brand spanking new. We decided the layout would actually work well for us.

Our favorite part is the private bath, the main point of contention with our old floor plan. We loved all the finishes, the storage, the beautiful kitchen with movable island!

It is so roomy. The living room slides are 42 inches deep!

I love having a full time dining room table again and a fireplace with heater.

Jim did some research on the brand and was satisfied. We offered the owners $25,000 and eventually settled on $28,000. It’s a little more than we hoped to pay but the rig is so much newer than we expected to find.

So there was the small issue that we were spending money we hadn’t yet made. Not very responsible of us. The flip house was under contract and the sale was going well but there were a thousand things that could go wrong. We threw caution to the wind and did it anyway.

We needed to leave Florida in a week so we didn’t have time to market the Alpenlite. No problem. Since the campground is so empty most of the summer you are allowed to leave your rig on your site and only pay $100 per month storage fee.

We figured we could sell it long distance in a month or so with the help of our daughter. But the park workers knew some full-time residents who had been living in a motorhome and were looking for more room. We sold it to them for $9500.

We’ve had a few problems with the Mesa, mostly related to it sitting for two years in Florida. The salty climate there is rough on exterior metal. It was very difficult to get the jacks up the first time. We’ve been working with them and applying lubricant and it keeps getting better but we still use a crow bar to get them to move sometimes.

The tanks were hooked up to sewer and the valves were just left open. The tanks were probably never rinsed. So the valves didn’t work and neither do most of the sensors that should tell us how full our tanks are. This is also getting better with time and care and will hopefully resolve itself.

Jim had read that a lot of people have trouble with the slide motors going out and he has already had to replace one. The good news is the replacement parts are said to be hardier than the ones originally installed in the factory. Also they are relatively cheap, less than $100, so we bought an extra.

We love some of the features available on this newer unit. My favorite is the electric awning.

If you’ve ever gotten up in the middle of the night to take down your awning because the wind unexpectedly picked up, you will understand my glee.

Jim’s favorite feature is the self-leveling jacks. At the push of a button (or several) it levels the rig and stabilizes it. The best part is it remembers the height where we pulled the truck out and returns to that position when it’s time to hook up.

It was hard to find everything we wanted without getting into a bigger rig. This one is just under 35 feet, almost 3 feet longer than our last one. But we had a rack on the back of our old one that stuck out 3 feet and held our kayaks.

We decided to get rid of the rack and keep the kayaks in Missouri where we use them most. We have enjoyed having them with us in our travels but have not used them enough to justify dragging them all over the country. We’ll carry our new inflatable kayak with us and will rent kayaks when necessary.

We have had our home for a month now and we are very happy with it. We moved into it in a hurry, then drove it back to Missouri in only three days. This is way faster than we prefer to travel but we had pressing matters to attend to at home.

We are going back and forth on what to do about solar power and/or generators. We definitely will install a solar system but can’t decide on whether to go with a very basic one or the fanciest one Jim can pull together. We’d love an on board generator that comes on with the touch of a button from inside but we haven’t really had that many occasions to use the two generators we have been carrying around. Decisions, decisions…