Hershey

Hershey, PA – September, 2016 When we started making tentative plans for this northeast loop many months ago Jim asked if America’s Largest RV Show could be on the itinerary. The show is hosted by the Pennsylvania RV and Camping Association and held in Hershey each September. A quick internet search for the show dates and a glance at the map and I assured him it could be done.

We planned to attend the show the first day, Wednesday. This also happened to be Senior Day. As is our M.O., we arrived 30 minutes before the gates opened. We parked in the huge lot which was free for this event and joined a long line waiting to get in.

Jim’s been 55 almost a year and we’ve only had a few occasions when we’ve benefited from a senior discount that was defined as 55+. For some reason Jim is not nearly as tickled as I am when we save money by being lumped in this category. Even though their website says the senior only qualifies for one half price ticket, they let him buy both our tickets so we got in for $5 each.

The day was forecast to be very hot so we chose to visit the outside exhibitors first. This included acres and acres of every conceivable type of RV, open for perusal. We spent hours checking out a sampling of all types of RVs, from tricked out motorhomes going for half a million to micro tow behinds for less than ten grand.

We thought about what changes we could make to our own home to make it more accommodating. We also seriously considered what type of rig we’d want next if it became necessary to replace ours. We mostly just enjoy poking around in open houses and this was a chance to do so on a micro scale mega times.

There are exciting ideas being incorporated into new RVs. Our favorites were in storage capacity. This Momentum 5th wheel by Grand Design had a feature that definitely made it our favorite even though at 41′ it was longer than we’d ever consider towing and more money than we would pay. It had a rear bedroom that was raised so that there was a small garage in the rear under the bed. This storage area would be large enough for our scooter and kayaks, or someone’s 4 wheeler or golf cart.

About noon we finally headed inside, hot and tired. The Giant Arena had displays all around the hallway at ground level and then filling up the entire court. There were plenty of interesting products and services available and we enjoyed checking them out for a couple hours.

I was prepared to be underwhelmed by this event as I had been somewhat disappointed by Quartzite’s RV show. Instead I was blown away. If I was planning to replace an RV within the year, I would try to make it to this show before making a decision on a model. The selection just couldn’t be beat and they were all ready to deal.

While we were in Hershey we had to visit Hershey’s Chocolate World. It was free so what they heck.

Mostly it was a large store with every product Hershey sells in one place. They had some free samples including products that weren’t yet for sale anywhere else. But the highlight was an animated ride taking you through their process of manufacturing products including talking farm animals.

We then visited downtown Hershey and walked around. It made for a nice stroll as there are plenty of cool old buildings. The street was lined with kiss-shaped street lights.

Jim really wanted to visit the Gettysburg battlefield an hour away. We looked into stopping there a night or two after leaving Hershey but couldn’t find a good, reasonably priced camping option. So I lobbied for a day trip instead.

The park was free but the museum and film were not. So we skipped them. We picked up a map at the visitor center and checked out the limited number of free exhibits they did have. Then we headed out on the self-guided driving tour.

The drive was pleasant and there was plenty to see. It was a lovely area.

And the cornfields and split rail fencing took you back in time.

There were numbered stops that corresponded to the map and took you through the 3 day battle. But primarily there were monuments, some 1,400 of them, scattered all over the place.

There were several larger ones, the most impressive being the Pennsylvania Memorial.

During our time in the area we chose to stay at PA Dutch Country RV Resort. It was 15 miles from Hershey but the closer ones were too expensive or booked. Dutch Country is a Thousand Trails property but our Thousand Trails pass does not cover this zone so we booked it through Passport America for $26 per day full hookups. It was a nice park except it was very poorly laid out and many sites were incredibly uneven front to back so I can’t say I’d go back.

Train Museum

Menifee, CA January, 2016 We chose a Thousand Trails campground an hour outside LA to stay at before and after our cruise to Mexico and to leave our fifth wheel during our 7 day absence. We made a 14 day reservation at Wilderness Lakes RV Resort. They let us stay in an electric only site the whole time without having to move to storage and it only cost us $3 per day.

We really liked this campground. There are canals running through it and they attract a lot of really interesting birds. Not so many that you have to watch where you step but enough that it makes every outing rather interesting wondering what strange fowl you might run across. It was also a bit out of town so you could strike out in any direction and have a pleasant walk along a country road.

The park had good amenities; putt putt, basketball and pickleball courts, game rooms. It was too cold for us to visit their pool or hot tub but stronger souls were using them. We did make use of their very nice pool hall. They also have a dynamite fitness room which we took advantage of a few times (trying to get ahead of all those calories we knew were waiting for us on the cruise).

We managed to fritter away 5 whole days here before we left with little to show for it. We did a lot of walking, we packed, and we shopped a little. The most interesting thing we did was visit the Orange Empire Railway Museum 11 miles north of our campground in Perris.

Jim is a railroad nut so when I read about this museum that was nearby and, better yet, FREE, it was a must see. It turned out to be a very good decision.

The museum consists of many barns full of machinery on 90 acres. It was rather deserted when we arrived on a Friday morning. We stepped into the gift shop and were informed that a docent had just started a tour and if we walked out to the back barns we might catch up with it. We did and we were led by a very informative tour guide for the next hour. We shared the tour with two families, each with small children, which made the morning even more entertaining.

We visited 5 of the barns. They have an amazing collection of both trains and streetcars. Many are fabulously original and others have been painstakingly restored.

Here is an electric locomotive that hauled freight in southern California until electrified freight service was converted to diesel in 1965.

This 1881 steam locomotive was part of a collection owned by Ward Kimball, a Disney animator. He named it Emma Nevada after a famous opera star from the late 1800s.

This is the inside of a mail car. All the work of a post office took place right inside the car as it made its rounds.

Here is a streetcar I believe operated in Santa Monica.

And my favorite, one of the last streetcar designs before most cities were converted to other types of public transit.

The docent had to unlock each barn for us so a self-guided tour seemed to be out of the question. I got the impression that on the weekends the barns are unlocked and you can wander at your own pace. They also offer train and trolley rides on the weekends and pull out a different one of several trains each time. They charge $12 per adult to ride these trains all day. I understand they generally operate 2 streetcars on a half mile loop and one train on a standard gauge 1.5 mile loop.

It made for a very interesting day and we would definitely recommend it to anyone visiting the area.